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NYU Langone Provider

Eugene E. Kim, MD

NYU Langone Provider
  • Specialties: Cardiology, Echocardiography
  • Treats: Adults
  • Language: English
  • Phone: 212-263-5665
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Conditions and Treatments

Conditions
  • abnormal heart rhythms
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • angina
  • aortic valve disease
  • aortic valve insufficiency
  • aortic valve stenosis
  • arterial occlusive disease
  • arteriosclerosis
  • atherosclerosis
  • atrial fibrillation
  • cardiac disease in pregnancy
  • carotid artery disease
  • carotid stenosis
  • cerebrovascular disorder
  • chest pain
  • chronic venous insufficiency
  • claudication
  • congestive heart failure
  • coronary heart disease
  • dilated cardiomyopathy
  • endothelial dysfunction
  • fainting
  • heart attack
  • heart disease
  • heart murmur
  • heart muscle disease
  • heart throbbing
  • heart tumor
  • high blood pressure disorder
  • high cholesterol level
  • hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  • inflammation of the heart valve
  • inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart
  • ischemic cardiomyopathy
  • lipid disorder
  • lipid metabolism
  • metabolic syndrome
  • mitral valve prolapse
  • mitral valve regurgitation
  • mitral valve stenosis
  • myocardial disease
  • myocarditis
  • obesity
  • occlusive vascular disease
  • peripheral vascular disease
  • rapid heartbeat
  • renal artery stenosis
  • renal vascular disorder
  • rheumatic heart disease
  • sarcoidosis
  • slow heartbeat
  • ventricular arrhythmia
  • ventricular fibrillation
  • ventricular tachycardia

Board Certifications
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (Cardiovascular Disease), 2010
Education and Training
  • Fellowship, NYU Medical Center, Cardiology, 2010
  • MD from University Of Connecticut, 2003

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This provider accepts the following insurance plans.

  • Aetna
     
    • Aetna HMO
    • Aetna Indemnity
    • Aetna Medicare
    • Aetna POS
    • Aetna PPO/EPO
  • Cigna
     
    • Cigna EPO/POS
    • Cigna PPO
  • Emblem
     
    • Emblem Select Care Exchange
  • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield
     
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield EPO
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield HMO
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield HealthPlus
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield HealthPlus Essential
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield Indemnity
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield MediBlue
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield POS
    • Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield PPO
  • Fidelis
     
    • Fidelis Child Health
    • Fidelis Essential
    • Fidelis Exchange
    • Fidelis Medicaid
    • Fidelis Medicare
  • GHI
     
    • GHI CBP
    • GHI HMO
  • HIP
     
    • HIP Access I
    • HIP Access II
    • HIP Child Health
    • HIP EPO/PPO
    • HIP Essential
    • HIP HMO
    • HIP Medicaid
    • HIP Medicare
    • HIP POS
View All Accepted Plans This list of insurances changes regularly, and insurance plans listed may not be accepted at all office locations for this provider. Before your appointment, please confirm with your insurance company that this provider accepts your insurance.

Locations and Appointments

NYU Non-Invasive Cardiology Associates

550 1st Avenue, 11th Floor, New York, NY 10016

Phone

212-263-5665

Fax

212-263-8461

NYU Langone Radiology Associates

97-85 Queens Boulevard, Queens, NY 11374

Phone

718-261-9100

Fax

718-261-6483

Interests

Cardiac conduction system, arrhythmias, sudden death, cardiac development

Research Summary

Our laboratory is interested in understanding the basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias with a focus on ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States and other developed countries with a large proportion occurring suddenly. Ventricular arrhythmias account for a substantial portion of these deaths and the basic underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. The specialized cells of the cardiac conduction system (CCS) play a prominent role in the initiation of such arrhythmias and our aim is to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we have discovered a number of molecular elements specific to conduction system cells that engender unique cellular identity and electrophysiology.

The first area of our research effort relates to the unique cellular behavior of CCS cells that predispose them to arrhythmogenesis. First described over 100 years ago, CCS cells remain poorly understood from a molecular and genetic standpoint due to their scarcity (comprising less than one percent of all cells in the heart) and the lack of cell culture model systems. However, in numerous inherited and acquired conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease, these cells have been shown to be important for the initiation of ventricular arrhythmias. CCS cells have unique electrophysiologic and intracellular calcium cycling characteristics that make them particularly pro-arrhythmic. Investigation into the nature of this pro-arrhythmic behavior through gene expression analysis and single cell physiology has uncovered unique pathways and potential therapeutic targets. For instance, the regulation of intracellular calcium and calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase 2 (CamKII) within CCS cells through the small IQ motif protein Purkinje cell protein 4 (Pcp4) was first discovered in our lab and is a novel mechanism regulating both ionic currents as well as excitation-contraction coupling that is specific to this cardiomyocyte subtype.

The second area of interest for our lab is in the transcriptional circuitry that underlies CCS development and cell fate specification. While elements of this transcriptional network have been described, recent advances in deep sequencing, chromatin state assessment, and single cell transcriptomics have allowed unprecedented resolution into these processes. Leveraging these techniques has allowed for the discovery of novel transcription factors critical for proper CCS development and elucidated the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern this process.

Read All Publications (17)