Inherited Heart Conditions We Treat

Experts at NYU Langone’s Cardiovascular Genetics Program specialize in treating patients who have several kinds of inherited cardiac conditions, which generally fall into two categories: channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

Channelopathies are a group of syndromes that affect your cardiovascular electrical system, predisposing you to life-threatening heart rhythm abnormalities. Cardiomyopathies are conditions of the heart muscle that make it harder for your heart to pump blood.


Because of the complex and subtle nature of cardiac channelopathies, it takes a team of specialists to fully diagnose, treat, and manage these conditions. The Cardiovascular Genetics Program at NYU Langone’s Heart Rhythm Center was designed to meet such a challenge.

Our experts combine world-renowned academic excellence and clinical judgment to care for one of the largest collective group of channelopathy patients in the world. Inherited cardiac channelopathy conditions that we provide treatment for include:

  • catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, in which the heart muscle becomes unstable when stressed because of physical exertion or emotional stress, leaving you prone to developing arrhythmias
  • Brugada syndrome, in which uncoordinated signals in your heart’s lower ventricles or chambers causes an interference in your heart’s normal rhythm
  • long QT syndrome, in which the heart muscle takes longer than normal to recover after each beat, usually caused by imbalances in the sodium or potassium channels that are integral for a healthy heart


Cardiomyopathy causes the heart muscle to thicken or become rigid, and if left untreated can weaken the heart and eventually lead to heart failure.

We diagnose and treat patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, which causes fatty tissue to gradually replace some areas of the heart muscle, making you prone to an abnormally fast heartbeat. We also provide treatment for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, another inherited disease in which part of the heart muscle thickens without an apparent cause.