Theodore Pincus, MD, Receives Distinguished Clinician Scholar Award From American College Of Rheumatology

Theodore P. Pincus, MD, clinical professor of rheumatology, Department of Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, received the Distinguished Clinician Scholar Award at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP) annual scientific meeting held in Washington, DC November 10-14. The Distinguished Clinician Scholar Award is given each year to a rheumatologist who has made outstanding contributions in clinical medicine, clinical scholarship, or education.

Dr. Pincus is director of outcomes research in the Division of Rheumatology at NYU Langone and is considered a leader in the field. He has made major contributions to understanding the importance of monitoring patient functional status on the outcome for patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). He is well known for his tireless advocacy of patient self-report to assess and document the status, treatment course and outcome of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and all rheumatic diseases. He developed the Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ), which also empowers the patient to prepare for their interaction with the doctor, improving doctor-patient communication.

A regular presenter at national and international medical symposia, Dr. Pincus has also published numerous book chapters, abstracts, and articles in such journals as JAMA, Arthritis and Rheumatism, Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine and Journal of Rheumatology. His research focuses on the development of better methods to assess and monitor the care of people with chronic diseases, the reduction of disparities in health according to socioeconomic status, the improvement of long-term outcomes through new drugs and the further description of a biopsychosocial model in chronic diseases.

Prior to his appointment to the Hospital for Joint Diseases at NYU Langone Medical Center in 2008, Dr. Pincus was professor of medicine and rheumatology at Vanderbilt University. He received his medical degree at Harvard University, completed residencies in internal medicine at Stanford University and Cornell-New York Hospital and a fellowship in internal medicine at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.