Nonsurgical Approaches for Neurofibromatosis

Pediatric and adult oncology services are offered at both the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center for all types of cancerous tumors related to neurofibromatosis. These centers can also help treat benign tumors that are causing the destruction of important nerves or tissues.

NYU Langone’s pediatric neuro-oncologists oversee the care of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 who have optic pathway gliomas. These grow on the nerves connecting the eyes to the brain and can cause problems with vision. They also treat other tumors of the brain or spinal cord. 

They may use chemotherapy, a combination of drugs that destroy cancer cells throughout the body, with or without surgery, to remove tumors. 

Surgery, with or without chemotherapy, and the possible addition of radiation therapy, which is the use of high levels of energy to destroy tumors, may be used for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and other benign or cancerous tumors of the body. 

Bevacizumab (Avastin®) is a medication offered to children and adults with vestibular schwannomas to improve or preserve hearing.

More Neurofibromatosis Resources